Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Why classic FRP does not fit interactive behavior

Why classic FRP does not fit interactive behavior

In functional reactive programming (FRP), the type we call “behaviors” model non-interactive behavior. To see why, just look at the semantic model: t -> a, for some notion t of time. One can argue as follows that this model applies to interactive behavior as well.

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